COPE CopeLine Supervisor

December 2018

Your Wellness & Work-Life Newsletter

Exercise: the All-Natural Treatment for Depression


According to research, one in 10 adults in the United States struggles with depression, and antidepressant medications are a common way to treat the condition. However, pills aren't the only solution. Research shows that exercise is also an effective treatment. "For some people it works as well as antidepressants, although exercise alone isn't enough for someone with severe depression," says Dr. Michael Craig Miller, assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

The Exercise Effect
Exercising starts a biological cascade of events that results in many health benefits, such as protecting against heart disease and diabetes, improving sleep, and lowering blood pressure. High-intensity exercise releases the body's feel-good chemicals called endorphins, resulting in the "runner's high" that joggers report. But for most of us, the real value is in low-intensity exercise sustained over time. That kind of activity spurs the release of proteins called neurotrophic or growth factors, which cause nerve cells to grow and make new connections. The improvement in brain function makes you feel better. "In people who are depressed, neuroscientists have noticed that the hippocampus in the brain (the region that helps regulate mood) is smaller. Exercise supports nerve cell growth in the hippocampus, improving nerve cell connections, which helps relieve depression," explains Dr. Miller.

The Challenge of Getting Started
Depression manifests physically by causing disturbed sleep, reduced energy, appetite changes, body aches, and increased pain perception, all of which can result in less motivation to exercise. It's a hard cycle to break, but Dr. Miller says getting up and moving just a little bit will help. "Start with five minutes a day of walking or any activity you enjoy. Soon, five minutes of activity will become 10, and 10 will become 15."

What You Can Do
It's unclear how long you need to exercise, or how intensely, before nerve cell improvement begins alleviating depression symptoms. You should begin to feel better a few weeks after you begin exercising. But this is a long-term treatment, not a onetime fix. "Pick something you can sustain over time," advises Dr. Miller. "The key is to make it something you like and something that you'll want to keep doing."

COPE Can Help
If you or someone you know appears to be suffering from depression, an assessment through your EAP could further help in determining the best course of action. For more information, contact Rose Smith, your Freddie Mac Onsite Counselor, at 703-903-2584 (office) or 571-212-3056 (cell). Or send an email to rose_smith@freddiemace.com or eap@cope-inc.com.

Source: Harvard Health Letter, April 30, 2018

The Mayo Clinic: Stress, Depression and the Holidays


Stress and depression can ruin your holidays and hurt your health. Being realistic, planning ahead and seeking support can help ward off stress and depression. With these practical tips, you can minimize the stress that accompanies the holidays. You may even end up enjoying them more than you thought you would.

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